• Webring Reminder

    From alterego@21:4/100 to Ogg on Mon Jun 1 10:07:34 2020
    Re: Webring Reminder
    By: Ogg to All on Sun May 31 2020 01:48 pm

    IE: Hubs dont sent to hubs, but rather post to the DB and pull from
    the DB.
    Wouldn't a system like that keep a DB growing and growing like one big blockchain?

    Not necessarily, you would still expire/purge messages as configured per echoarea.

    How would you know when all the old (picked up and received) messages were all collected?

    I havent worked through this in great detail, but I think I was heading down a path that incoming mail would be queue for collection (a record in a queue table) - so when that system polled I know exactly what is waiting for them. (Which then also enables a stats table of who hasnt collected mail.)

    %RESCAN would still work as well, resending the last x or days of messages (probably useful for new systems configured).

    So instead of directories full of individual packets or packet bundles per system, the data was sitting in a database.

    Right that would be the end goal. For me to completely realise this, I need to change binkd (or write a binkd), that built a mail bundle when a connection came in dynamically. I'm probably going to need help here - I did start, on this, but I didnt want to re-write a zmodem.

    Speaking of ansitex, can you please disable that shell in my account on your system and reset me to the default? The *nn# commands didn't seem to respond for me. I couldn't get back to the S)etup screen so that I could switch to another shell.

    Not sure what you meant by didnt respond. I have the "#" and return keys mapped











































































































































































































































    so selecting a page *516# or *516 <enter> should work. *90# should have taken you to the familiar Synchronet user configuration page, where you could then re-choose your shell.

    I've probably broken some functionality, as I fixed or enhanced something else - so I know I have a few things to fix before its ready for prime time. (The main dev is not on my main BBS, but on an instance of SBBS which isnt directly accessible.)

    Ansitex is not what I thought it was. :( Too much repetative typing for me.

    What did you think it was?

    I think its a BBS version of the world wide web. Service providers own a page prefix (like a domain name for the internet), and can host any page in their prefix.

    Navigating around is by typing a page *nnn...# (like typing an address in your











































































































































































































































    browser), or navigating via menus. Each page can "link" to another page (as defined on the page), using the number keys 0-9.

    Convention was that "0" would take you "up" to a menu - but it was only convention not a rule.

    When its working, I'll have "about ansitex" on pages *516#, end user help and system config on a page begining with *9.., and public echomail on *1.. - leaving pages *200... to *899... (in 3 character prefixes) available to anybody











































































































































































































































    who wants to host a (set of) pages. (And if they run Synchonet with my shell, then can author the pages on their system.)

    Anyway, I'll share when its a little more robust - thanks for taking a look and



























































































































































































































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